To Kill A Mockingbird

Sourced from Wikipedia
Rate: 4 of 5
Genre: Racial injustice, Southern life, Classic America literature, slice-of-life

Summary:  In Maycomb, a sleepy countryside, there were black people living in a border. White people had practised a racial injustice and inequality among the society.

 Scout, the narrator of the book, was 6-years-old daughter of the Finch family and her older brother, Jem, was 4 year older than her. Dill who was betrothed to her lived temporarily in his aunt’s house nearby her house. As the rumor of Boo Radley hiding in the house triggered their curiosity, the trio attempted to peek Radley’s haunting house in dark but they were almost shot by the defensive owner after they made strange noises outside the house. Figuring out who made noises outside the house, everyone in the town thought it was the dog which had disappeared.  Atticus Finch, the Father, suspected that his children had been involved in the troubling activity but he tried to convey something that was highlighting about the society to his own children. The children were not supposed to sneak in Radley’s house since nobody dared to enter. Boo Radley had been hid in the house for the rest of his life in order to get out of the legal shame.

Scout started to wonder what was going on in her town as there were many happenings.

Review: I happened to learn about this title through a recommending list of “The Temptation” book. I have completed this book on 26th Nov. It is suitable for readers with high literacy and those who are interested in literature because it has a complicated language. I am a city woman who has no knowledges what Scout had experienced in the countryside (rural area) and politics and racial injustic. It is really meaningful for me. I guess that author was more wise and knowledgable. She had linked many characters from the book to those people she knew in her life.

The book has two parts – one is the childhood’s play and one is the courthouse and the influence on the children.

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